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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. one study found that walmart employees in california were nearly 40% more likely to use public assistance to make ends meet. costing the state's taxpayers $86 million annually. that means people with jobs in that state are still having to turn to the public safety net to get by. because working at walmart is not sustainable employment. if walmart became the standard across all retailers in california, taxpayers would have to subsidize their fellow workers with an additional $410 million a year. yet according to a study by the policy development and advocacy administration, it would only cost a typical shopper $17.73 a year if walmart paid its employees at least $25,000 a year. if that became the standard, more than 700,000 americans would be lifted out of poverty. that's the key here. because while walmart may not be alone in its low-wage minimal labor benefit practices, as the nation's biggest player can set the standards that make the difference. as the venerable sam walton once said, we work together, we'll lower the cost of living for everyone. we'll give the world an oppor
. in california you had the new system. the democrats are going to make gains in california or could make gains in california. that's something that has to come in on a state level. pennsylvania is a perfect example. states that obama won by five points. i think the delegation of pennsylvania will be like 13/5 republican coming out. >> i'm sorry, it brings it back to the fact that all politics are local. if i ever learned anything before, i've learned that about this presidency and how it's not just one man that can do things. we have to really pay attention. >> yes. >> people don't. >> i think our chances of getting universal registration, same day voter registration are far better than ending the gerrymandering which is at the state level. democrats in the house won by over 500,000 votes and yet they only picked up 18. i can assure you they'll fight back. >> when we come up next, i've got a letter. y'all know you love my mailbag. my letter today to ohio's john houston. stay with us. look how small they were! [ husband ] transfer! [ male announcer ] free data transfer at home. you just deleted
, california, democratic senator barbara boxer. senator, it is so good for you to join us this evening. thank you. >> i'm delighted. just delighted. >> senator boxer, talk to me a bit about what we saw happen in 2008 on the one hand sort of women showing up in an amazing way as secretary of state clinton has said, putting all of those cracks in the glass ceiling and then rolling back right there in congress by 2010. what do we do to get our voices back? >> well, i believe we're going to have our voices back on election day. i really believe that the women are going to break for barack obama. and, you know, it isn't like these issues are hard to follow. we look at the republican platform and what does it say? it says that no abortion, no abortion, you're a criminal if you get an abortion, even in cases of rape and insiscest. the reason i po cuss on rape is how outrageous it is, melissa. it is a crime. it's such a vicious crime in half the states there no limitation. if there's dna found 10, 20 later, you go after the perpetrator. i think women get it. mitt romney didn't lift a finger to change
relatively little fanfare. voters in california approved a ballot measure to reform the state's notorious three strikes law. one of the strict he's sentencing policies in the nation. under the law, if a defendant has two serious convictions, a third conviction for any felony automatically resulted in imprisonment 25 years to life. that meant that a crime like shoplifting could earn the offender a life sentence. under the revised law, a life sentence goes into effect if the third felony is a violent crime. california's decision is a long overdue movement on the practice of imposing the heaviest sentences for the lightest of crimes. unfortunately, there's been much less progress when it comes to u.s. drug policy and reform around mandatory minimum sentencing. the 1986 anti-drug abuse act was passed after the death of university of maryland player len bias from a drug overdose. it started by tip o'neil of making a demonstration of being tough on crime. it was intended to prosecute high-level drug dealers. what it actually did was to ensnare low level offenders for small quantities of drugs b
of california flew in to marry us. it was epic, so special, the best night of our lives by far. i highly recommend it to everybody out there. go get married. whoever you want to marry. in certain states now, if you are part of the lesbian and gay community, you have that option to be able to do that. it was so fulfilling. i grew up pretending a lot to fit in, pretending to be straight. i find now and aishia, you could probably speak to this as well. when you find your voice, you do not want to shut up about it. i have found my choice. i feel very privileged to have found it. patrick and i were together 12 years up to the point where we got married. we deserved that opportunity. >> i feel like there is something as you point out. the 4-year-old on up. the fact that they have also. it is not just you two making this choice. it is that your whole families are participating in a way that contributes to an expanding definition of family for the 4-year-old and all the way up. given that we are looking at communities where people are going to have these expanded social understandings, how does
. >> my parents were farm workers. i grew up migrating from california, nebraska, and washington state. i know what need is and what poverty is. they never took welfare. >> this is an interesting point. it does feel like the republican party on this question is made up of two different coalitions. one is often the sort of up from narrative of folks who came up from circumstances of poverty. then there is the mitt romney version of republicanism we saw on display this time which isn't an up from there. it's very much we have it and want to protect it narrative. >> well, look, i work for a school district in south texas. and we were dealing with a truancy case in one instance. it was a 12-year-old on her second pregnancy. they said because we have klee claims at a welfare bite. we are not in an ungenerous nation. $1 trillion we pay for 82 means tested welfare programs. >> if you have a 12-year-old who is in a circumstance of pregnancy, it is almost certain that she is not pregnant by a 12-year-old boy. it is almost certain that she is pregnant by someone who is basically in a situation of a
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)